Musings on Kate Spade

original kate spade bag photo
External Expression of Internal Relationship

Although I’ve never owned a Kate Spade handbag, I have admired many. I can remember when her name first came to represent the simple black bags made of fabric and how quickly these fashion staples began to grace the arms of women seemingly everywhere.

Kate Spade items always had a unique elegance. Her pieces were understated, and this made a big statement of contrast in the sea of more flashy, more logo centric bags that dominated the market in the early 90s.

I’ve always remembered something that I read about Kate and her first pitch to a major retailer. The story goes that Kate was studying her uncomplicated handbags the night before she was scheduled to present her designs to the high-end buyers. In this moment, she decided on a whim to remove all the labels with her block printed name from inside of the bags and stitch them to the outside. She and her husband spent the entire night carefully resewing each label to the front of the simple bags.

It was this one design element that took a rather unremarkable handbag and made it an international brand—instantly recognizable and instantly unique.

As an Apostolic woman, I may seem plain to some. My choice to reject the world’s standards of a woman’s beauty, my choice to dress modestly, and my choice to age naturally may make me unremarkable in the eyes of many. However, it also makes me a blank canvas. A canvas to which an Almighty God can affix with precious blood his Name for all to see. And… that changes everything.

Rest in peace Kate Spade
 ♠️.

From an admirer of your creativity,
Jaye M. Rodenbush

Kate Spade jpeg

Kissing is Just Embarrassing: Modern kids and their right to privacy.
 By: Jaye M. Rodenbush, B.A., M.S. Ed.

It was my mother-in-law’s ordination service, a special moment for the entire family. We were all celebrating and honoring an amazing lady, even my parents were there, my father had given the ordination charge. All in all, it was a great evening. While snapping photos at the end of the ceremony, my mother-in-law and my mom posed for a quick shot with my nine-year-old son Robbie. Then my mom reached down and gave him a sweet kiss on the cheek. My photographer brain instantly said, “Aww…Both grandmas this time.” And, my mother-in-law bent over and kissed his other cheek. His eyes rolled a bit, but a big smile swept over his face and I snapped one of my favorite photos ever of my precious little boy.

That one photo represents so much of what I love about this season in life. I love the fact that I am blessed to have both my mom and mother-in-law in my life. I love that they are incredible women, that they are respected and being honored for their work and their achievements. I love that they are wonderful grandmas, each with their own style of love and their own little endearments. I love that they are both so different in some ways, but equally generous with their love and affection, although it is demonstrated uniquely by each of them in their own special ways. I love that my kids are getting to see them still active in the ministries that they have given their lives to. I love that they are influencing my kids with stories of the past and passing on so many things that only the future will reveal.

I know, that this situation, the fact that God has allowed us this beautiful moment in time where we all are working together, living close, with our lives intertwined is so rare. It is something precious and something to be treasured. We’ve been given a gift that just doesn’t happen for most families. So, in my sentimentality, that photo instantly became priceless to me. I went home and that same night I uploaded a few of the photos from the event to social media, including the “double-grandma kiss” photo.
The photo was liked and comments were piling up, when Robbie came home from Nana Rodenbush’s house. He said, “Mom, Nana said you posted that kissing picture! Did you have to do that?” My heart sank. My baby was just not getting it! This photo represented his heritage. Plus, it was just too cute! Instantly, I remembered a recent covenant that I had made to myself regarding my children’s personal privacy. So, I asked him if he wanted it removed. I did say that I just thought it was a sweet photo, but I was unpersuasive. “I love Grandma and Nana, but Mom, kissing is just embarrassing!” So, reluctantly, and with a little disappointment, I removed the photo. He and I had a talk and I told him that our family life and family photos are typically private. We might share some, but that he can let me know any time he wished something be removed from or not be put on social media.

I’ve seen so many cringe-worthy things on Facebook and Instagram that are simply a violation of a child’s privacy. I know things are cute, and there are special moments that on the surface might be fun to share with the world, but really shouldn’t kids have a right to feel that their home is not a public arena? Shouldn’t they feel like they can fall down, make a bad decision or a mistake, get in trouble, sing silly songs, play silly games and the whole world not have a front row seat? Isn’t our job as parents to provide a place where kids can relax, let down their guard, be themselves or find themselves without their every move being broadcast? When a parent publicly posts videos, messages or photos of discipline, shaming, punishments, practical jokes that makes a child look foolish or stupid, or when a child is not properly attired he or she has violate a sacred trust. A mother and a father supposed to be a child’s protector. Whether or not they can fully understand it, a child trusts a parent to protect them, not only physically, but parents must protect the child’s right to privacy and dignity in their own home, their reputation, their emotions and to the best of the parent’s ability, the child’s safety. It’s a fine line, and when kids are in on the jokes, when they are okay with the photos and fine with the exposure then perhaps that’s different. But, I think they deserve to have an opinion and I think as parents we should listen.

My “double-grandma kiss” photo will take its place in the family photo album. Maybe the fact that it’s reserved for just our family will make it a little more special, who knows? Maybe someday Robbie will treasure the photo as much as I do. I sure hope so. And, just maybe someday he will even post it himself. But for now he is nine and “kissing is just embarrassing.”

Kissing is Embarassing Blog JPEG

Kissing is Just Embarrassing:

Modern kids and their right to privacy.
By: Jaye M. Rodenbush, B.A., M.S. Ed.

It was my mother-in-law’s ordination service, a special moment for the entire family. We were all celebrating and honoring an amazing lady, even my parents were there, my father had given the ordination charge. All in all, it was a great evening. While snapping photos at the end of the ceremony, my mother-in-law and my mom posed for a quick shot with my nine-year-old son Robbie. Then my mom reached down and gave him a sweet kiss on the cheek. My photographer brain instantly said, “Aww…Both grandmas this time.” And, my mother-in-law bent over and kissed his other cheek. His eyes rolled a bit, but a big smile swept over his face and I snapped one of my favorite photos ever of my precious little boy.
That one photo represents so much of what I love about this season in life. I love the fact that I am blessed to have both my mom and mother-in-law in my life. I love that they are incredible women, that they are respected and being honored for their work and their achievements. I love that they are wonderful grandmas, each with their own style of love and their own little endearments. I love that they are both so different in some ways, but equally generous with their love and affection, although it is demonstrated uniquely by each of them in their own special ways. I love that my kids are getting to see them still active in the ministries that they have given their lives to. I love that they are influencing my kids with stories of the past and passing on so many things that only the future will reveal.
I know, that this situation, the fact that God has allowed us this beautiful moment in time where we all are working together, living close, with our lives intertwined is so rare. It is something precious and something to be treasured. We’ve been given a gift that just doesn’t happen for most families. So, in my sentimentality, that photo instantly became priceless to me. I went home and that same night I uploaded a few of the photos from the event to social media, including the “double-grandma kiss” photo.
The photo was liked and comments were piling up, when Robbie came home from Nana Rodenbush’s house. He said, “Mom, Nana said you posted that kissing picture! Did you have to do that?” My heart sank. My baby was just not getting it! This photo represented his heritage. Plus, it was just too cute! Instantly, I remembered a recent covenant that I had made to myself regarding my children’s personal privacy. So, I asked him if he wanted it removed. I did say that I just thought it was a sweet photo, but I was unpersuasive. “I love Grandma and Nana, but Mom, kissing is just embarrassing!” So, reluctantly, and with a little disappointment, I removed the photo. He and I had a talk and I told him that our family life and family photos are typically private. We might share some, but that he can let me know any time he wished something be removed from or not be put on social media.
I’ve seen so many cringe-worthy things on Facebook and Instagram that are simply a violation of a child’s privacy. I know things are cute, and there are special moments that on the surface might be fun to share with the world, but really shouldn’t kids have a right to feel that their home is not a public arena? Shouldn’t they feel like they can fall down, make a bad decision or a mistake, get in trouble, sing silly songs, play silly games and the whole world not have a front row seat? Isn’t our job as parents to provide a place where kids can relax, let down their guard, be themselves or find themselves without their every move being broadcast? When a parent publicly posts videos, messages or photos of discipline, shaming, punishments, practical jokes that makes a child look foolish or stupid, or when a child is not properly attired he or she has violate a sacred trust. A mother and a father supposed to be a child’s protector. Whether or not they can fully understand it, a child trusts a parent to protect them, not only physically, but parents must protect the child’s right to privacy and dignity in their own home, their reputation, their emotions and to the best of the parent’s ability, the child’s safety. It’s a fine line, and when kids are in on the jokes, when they are okay with the photos and fine with the exposure then perhaps that’s different. But, I think they deserve to have an opinion and I think as parents we should listen.  

My “double-grandma kiss” photo will take its place in the family photo album. Maybe the fact that it’s reserved for just our family will make it a little more special, who knows? Maybe someday Robbie will treasure the photo as much as I do. I sure hope so. And, just maybe someday he will even post it himself. But for now he is nine and “kissing is just embarrassing.”
Kissing is Embarassing Blog JPEG

 

Raising Counter-Cultural Kids

I am deeply heavy-hearted tonight for our country and our world. I felt impressed to share with you these concerns. I am grieved for the society our children will inherit. The chaos is escalating and without a miracle, we are likely to witness more unrest and devastation on American soil. Perhaps this seems reactionary, or overly cautious, but I think we have to start looking at this practically.

We must ask ourselves exactly what does domestic terrorism, shootings, and acts of senseless violence mean for our families? We are literally staring evil in the face. This is not to say that I think we should cower, isolate ourselves, or hide in bunkers. I am burdened, but I refuse to live in fear. Fear is a temptation that must be rejected, resisted and pushed back upon (2 Timothy 1:7). God promised us that if we would resist the Devil he would flea from us (James 4:7). I know God is able to keep His hand on His people, but we have to face the new reality of life in America. We are not completely insulated or immune from attack. God can deliver us from evil, or He can keep us if His will requires us to walk through a dark moment, or if we must face hardship or endure tragedy.

This country has been blessed with abundance, wealth and good fortune and instead of acknowledging God’s provisions, the nation seems to have squandered the inheritance and finds itself like the prodigal son covered with filth and desperate. You can feel the shift, you can see the panic and the alarm in people’s eyes and I think some are searching to get back to stability, back to the foundation. But, others keep digging themselves further into the mud and who knows how low the bottom has to be before they will admit the error of their ways and search again for God and His paths. It seems as a nation we only acknowledge our need for God when we are knocked to our knees by tragedy. Healing, peace, restoration will not come unless the people of this nation are humbled, unless they pray, unless they reject wickedness and evil. I’m not saying attacks of terror are God’s will, but I do know that from our knees we are humbled.

My main point here is to encourage us as parents to start thinking about these things very seriously. How do we live and raise our families in these uncertain times? First, we have got to work every day to educate our children’s minds against the deluge of anti-Christian indoctrination that they are facing. The enemy has come in like a flood and it is our job as parents to start bailing the water from out of the minds and hearts of our kids. Nearly everything about living a Christian life goes against the politically correct status quo in America today. We are asking our kids to live completely counter-culturally. This is no easy task. It means they have to reject most of the ideology that comes with public education. It means they have to reject the immorality and depravity of media and entertainment. It means they will not fit in. It means they will stand out. They will be different. They will be targeted for ridicule. They will face opposition. We can’t expect that an hour of Sunday School or Youth Service once a week is enough preparation for the enemy’s attack. It’s a complete war for their mind. They need answers to hard questions. They need support and guidance. Dads, moms, grandpas and grandmas we have a great work to do.

Second, I would suggest that we not wait until we are brought to our knees to get on our knees and pray. We’ve got to pray for our families, our children, and our nation. Pray a hedge of protection around them physically and mentally. Pray they can walk in peace, not in trepidation. Pray that they receive spiritual discernment that they can see for themselves what is good and what is evil. Pray that they have the courage to reject the enemy’s attempt to define decency, modesty, morality downward until there is no decency, modesty, or morality at all. We must pray that they have a boldness of heart and passionate spirits that help them to indeed live counter-culturally, without embarrassment or shame.

Finally, there are practical elements to all of this, and sometimes this is the most difficult because it takes intentionality and time to deal with. However, the chaos and confusion, the attacks against our country via terrorism and other violence seem unlikely to come to an end anytime soon. As families, we’ve got to stop assuming it will never affect us. We can’t just naively say it’s too awful to think about, and just ignore it altogether. I urge you to talk to your children about these issues. I don’t mean scare them, but there are ways to address this at different age- appropriate levels. Kids are smart. They read emotional cues. They pick up on emotional upset and our worry. They probably know more than we think they know anyway, so it’s our job to add context to the information they are trying to process. Develop emergency plans for different situations. Give them instructions about what to do if they are in a crowded public area and there is a crisis, shooting or other attack. Teach them to immediately follow commands in public settings without asking, “Why?” Trust your own gut instincts if you feel hesitant or unsure about you or your child’s safety. Talk about ways criminals try to deceive children into inappropriate relationships both online and in person. Talk about human trafficking and how young kids, both boys and girls, are entrapped through the Internet. Explain that video and mobile games that provide location data are used by malicious people to find a way to lure them into capture.

It feels so overwhelming, the weight of dealing with life in today’s world. It’s new technology, new language, new problems we’ve never faced. But we are not without help. My husband and I often go back to the scriptures in Mathew 24. At the same time God is listing all of the seemingly horrible and incomprehensible things His people will face in the last days He says, “See that ye be not troubled.” This counter-intuitive message is what we must cling to. God has His hand on our children. He has His hand on His church and if we can just endure until the end, He has a way, a plan and we shall be saved.

And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you. For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many. And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet. For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom: and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes, in divers places. All these are the beginning of sorrows. Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake. And then shall many be offended, and shall betray one another, and shall hate one another. And many false prophets shall rise, and shall deceive many. And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold. But he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved 
(Matthew 24:4-13).

Raising Counter-Cultural Kids.jpg

What’s in a Song?

What's in a song layout jpeg

 

 

We know song is powerful. We know it has influence. We know it affects the minds and hearts of our children. Someone once said, “If you want to know something about their world, get to know their music.” Yet, transitioning from parenting small children to parenting preteens and teens can be difficult. Going to the next level is hard. We were good at the nursery rhymes and the little bedtime routine songs, but when they start listening to their own music the challenge to stay connected and involved is in some ways much harder.

Admit it, “The Wheels on the Bus” probably wasn’t your favorite song. However, you listened anyway. You made silly faces. You got into it. Yet, as our kids age, too many of us become less engaged with our kid’s music choices, precisely at the time when it matters the most. We make sure everyone has their own set of headphones, their own playlists, their own iPods and music becomes a solitary activity instead of something enjoyed and discussed together.

No one needs a lecture to know that the lyrics of today’s secular music are more sexualized, more violent, contain more graphic content than ever before. But, perhaps we do need reminded that what’s in a song is more than words. Songs are ideas – concepts – philosophies – (sermons really), set to catchy tunes that take up residence in hearts and minds. Ideas that impact how one sees the world and ideas that influence how one thinks and how one behaves. That is power!

WHAT’S IN A SONG?

Song. Music. Rhythm. Rhyme.

Its resonance sweeps through the mind,
and in a heart a place it finds.

Its intention though I may not see.
But what’s in the song, is now in me.

Sometimes it’s a whisper, peaceful.
Sometimes it’s a voice alluring, blissful.

Other times with powerful force,
an emotion is struck and it stops my course.

A single tear or a fountain flows,
all because the song knows.

A song can cut through the toughest defenses,
tearing with ease those emotional fences.

Great moments of worship,
great moments of praise.

The right song can change spirits
on even the worst of days.

A song of worship can inspire the heart
alter emotion, make sadness depart.

But the gift God gave his children for joy,
Satan lays wait, intent to destroy.

So he mixes song with violence and evil
indulging the fleshly desires of the people.

Songs once reserved for holy demonstration
Serve now to display Satan’s manipulation.

The music plays on, crowds mindlessly cheer
No self-reflection, no moral compass to steer.

So what’s in a song, and why should I care?
What does it matter? It isn’t a prayer!

But the song has purpose, an agenda to fulfill
Songs look for hearts and bend their will.

What’s in the song is now in me.
The work’s been done. Can we not see?

Right looks wrong and wrong looks right.
The songs kept leading right into the night.

How did we get here? Where are we now?
The darkness is frightening!
Can we exit somehow?

It was just music, just rhythm, just rhyme…
a composers refrain, and us all keeping time.

But wait…

It’s more than just words. It’s more than a beat.
A song can bring thousands to knees or to feet.

We must reclaim the song.
Lift up our King, a great army, strong.

A song is worship, a song is praise
A song is an anthem of adoration to raise.

A song is a weapon that can help set me free.
Because what’s in the song is in me!

CHARLIE CHARLIE CHALLENGE

You might not know what hashtag CharlieCharlieChallenge means, but chances are your school-aged child does. According to the Washington Post, it has been tweeted over 1.6 million times. And, “more people are Googling ‘Charlie Charlie’ than virtually any other news event.” It’s an old legend and schoolyard game that has been around for a very long time, mostly in Spanish-language culture. It’s a simple game really, two pencils placed on top of one another on a paper with the words “yes” and “no” on four corners. In séance-like fashion participants summons the demon Charlie to turn the pencils to tell their fortunes.

Now, the challenge has become viral. Millions of kids are updating their Instagram accounts and Facebook pages with videos of their attempts to summon demonic spirits. While many people may say this is just a silly game, or hoax, I fear it is yet another way for the enemy to familiarize our children with occult darkness. We know this generation is drawn to the sensational, and to the supernatural. They like shock and awe and the bigger the risk the better the reward in social media.

A generation ago, we may have heard stories of kids playing with Ouija boards or something similar, but there was always a certain hesitancy, even among the non-churched kids, a bit a fear, or reticence to get mixed up with that type of thing. Sure, there was always a group of kids who pushed the limits, but they were the minority. Today, a quick search of Charlie Charlie Challenge videos will show you that most of these kids don’t fear evil at all. They are drawn to it. They’ve been raised with access to violent media. They’re literature, cartoons, toys and video games are full of vampires, witches, warlocks and wizards. It may be easy to write this off this as just another Internet meme, just a game, just another fad, but really? Will we who are raising children in these last days, in perilous times, will we be so easily dismissive of darkness and the occult? We cannot allow it to become the norm for demons to be invoked on our playgrounds.

We cannot just assume our Christian children will naturally shy away from these things. They need our parental direction, our guidance and our leadership. Darkness cannot be our plaything. Our homes cannot be filled with entertainment that glorifies the occult and then expect that our children will grow to glorify God. We must explain where this type of thing leads us in culture and in our hearts. Church culture has become so obsessed with teaching the love and grace of God that we have neglected the teaching of the fear of God. We don’t want our kids to be afraid of God so we fail to talk about Satan, about evil, and about hell – and we are doing them a grave disservice. We must be concerned about restoring the fear of God into the hearts of our children. Not so they live a life of guilt or shame, but so that they feel conviction and hesitation at Satan’s luring. It is our duty to show the contrast between holy and unholy, good and evil, right and wrong. “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding” (Proverbs 9:10). Left to their own devices they will be ensnared away.

Reference:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2015/05/26/the-complete-true-story-of-charlie-charlie-the-demonic-teen-game-overtaking-the-internet/